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Clinical Guidance

RCOphth responds to new framework for restarting National Institute of Health Research activities

May 27
2020

The National Insitute of Health Research NIHR has set out a framework to guide the restarting of NIHR research activities which have been paused due to COVID-19. This framework has been developed in cooperation with Devolved Administrations who will produce aligned, but specific guidance for their area. Commenting on the new framework, RCOphth Academic Committee

  • 27 May 2020

NOD Audit will continue to manage services during COVID-19

Apr 01
2020

During these unprecedented times, The Royal College of Ophthalmologists will continue to deliver and manage its services to members where feasible. This includes the NOD Audit, which will continue to be managed by the NOD team and in liaison with trusts and surgeons. The collection of data, analysis and reporting of outcomes for individual surgeons and

  • 1 April 2020

Ophthalmic Safety Alert- Do not use apraclonidine in infants below six months of age

Feb 21
2019

The College has recently received a report from NHS Improvement of a severe adverse reaction in a six month old child with anisocoria who had been administered apraclonidine 1% to help exclude Horner syndrome.  Two drops of apraclonidine 1% were administered to each eye, 30 minutes apart.  Ninety minutes later the child had an acute

  • 21 February 2019

How to protect patients and NHS staff against influenza infection

Sep 13
2018

Flu immunisation remains the most effective method to help protect against influenza infection. Along with other interventions, influenza immunisation is an important tool in preventing and controlling respiratory infections in healthcare settings. Public Health England estimates that an average 8,000 people die from flu in England each year. Some years that figure reaches 14,000. That’s

  • 13 September 2018

Ophthalmic Safety Alert – Diabetic control and safe cataract surgery

May 01
2018

The College has received queries from members to clarify whether there is a specific cut off for glycaemic control, either measured via HbA1C or a blood glucose level on the day, beyond which it is unsafe to proceed with cataract surgery. There is anecdotal evidence of cataract surgery cases being cancelled for surgery if their

  • 1 May 2018